Call (+64) 3 304 7654, or Email marie@theseventhgeneration.org

Trappers Guide

The purpose of this Trappers Guide is to improve the operation and maintenance of our trapping program. This guide should help professional and volunteer trappers alike and standardise the management of traps across land ownership or tenure.

Some pests are intelligent enough to learn from bad experiences and will quickly discover how to avoid poisons, traps and spot lights if your first attempts to kill them are not successful. Using a range of traps, baits, toxins and techniques and cycling toxins from one knockdown to the next, helps to avoid a build-up of wise, bait or trap shy animals.


Traps that are not managed to a high standard are likely to increase the likelihood of bait shyness as an almost trapped animal is likely to be a never seen again pest. Poor maintenance also increases the replacement cost of lost or damaged traps.


Another key focus of this guide is for trappers to feel engaged, supported and vital to the success of a trapping program. It is hoped that this guide will help to inspire improvements not only in trapping but in your personal safety and enjoyment.

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The Australian Magazine Writes about Marie Haley and The Seventh Generation Tour Akaroa

Written in the Stars by Jane Nicolls

In the tiny port of Akaroa, Marie Haley recently launched her thoroughly researched history safari tour and it’s now a Local Connections tour. A descendant of the original French settlers, Haley recounts the past, including tales of French and British settlers and Maori warriors, and lays out a vision of a sustainable future. She tells us how those early settlers couldn’t sleep for the racket from the native birds, and tells us about The Wildside Project on the Banks Peninsula and conservationist Hugh Wilson’s private Hinewai Reserve, both of which are bringing back native flora and fauna.

Marie Haley Conservationist – Latitude Magazine – Life on the Wildside, Akaroa

Akaroa Conservationist Marie Haley from The Seventh Generation Tours is featured in this months Latitude Magazine for her role in establishing the Wildside Project and new boutique business venture guiding travellers to a deeper understanding of Akaroa History and Nature. #Akaroa #Wildside #BPCT #TheSevnethGenerationTours

2017 Green Ribbon Award Winner

The Wildside story started 25 years ago, when a Banks Peninsula farmer set out to protect the little blue penguins on his farm. Since then this project has grown to harness a whole community in protecting the special environment of the Banks Peninsula.

In 2001, the Banks Peninsula Conservation Trust was formed, with the legal ability to covenant private land and manage its own conservation projects.

In 2010, a coordinator was employed to bring together the Trust’s many efforts into one cohesive project – and Wildside was born. The aims of the project were to engage and educate people, to add economic value to the land by protecting its environmental health, to protect forest habitat, stream health, native species and sites of ecological significance, and to promote marine protection.

The project has seen more than 700 predator traps set over 7000 hectares, which has enabled a dramatic turn-around in sea bird species in the area.

The Trust has also achieved protection of a whole stream through private farmland from the summit to the sea. A second stream is now being targeted.

Today, around 25 per cent of the area has been protected through covenants and reserves, allowing the forest to regenerate. The area now boasts the largest private reserve in New Zealand, Hinewai, which covers 1570 hectares.

Source link: Green Ribbon Awards

Abundance and breeding distribution of the white-flippered penguin (Eudyptula minor albosignata) on Banks Peninsula, New Zealand

Abstract: A survey of the white-flippered penguin (Eudyptula minor albosignata) nesting colonies on Banks Peninsula,
New Zealand was made during the 2000/01 and 2001/02 breeding seasons. Sixty-eight colonies were found of which
51 contained 5-20 nests, 12 21-50 nests, and 5 >50 nests. Altogether there were 2112 nests which equates to a population
of c. 5870 birds. Adding the estimated 1650 nests on Motunau Island gave a total population for the subspecies of
c. 10,460 birds. The colonies were distributed right around the peninsula with their occurrence increasing from west to
east. Most were situated either on the peripheral coast (47%) or inside bays within 1 km of their entrance (38%). All but
three of the colonies were on debris slopes below coastal bluffs with the nests concentrated mainly in rock piles. One
colony was on an islet, and the other two were on farmland around the heads of bays. Thirty-four of the colonies were
considered accessible to introduced mammalian predators, and 14 contained evidence predators had been present.
If predator numbers remain high it seems inevitable that many of the surviving penguin colonies will be lost and others
reduced in size.

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