Call (+64) 3 304 7654, or Email marie@theseventhgeneration.org

Marie Haley Conservationist – Latitude Magazine – Life on the Wildside, Akaroa

Akaroa Conservationist Marie Haley from The Seventh Generation Tours is featured in this months Latitude Magazine for her role in establishing the Wildside Project and new boutique business venture guiding travellers to a deeper understanding of Akaroa History and Nature. #Akaroa #Wildside #BPCT #TheSevnethGenerationTours

Banks Peninsula Locals Sustainability Story

Watch this video to understand why Banks Peninsula is such a remarkable place!

Local student Marco Varray, 12, has created this winning documentary film in the National Outlook for Someday competition. The film features local characters who tell their story of sustainability, it also captures the unique outlook of this rural community who are passionate about living a sustainable and enjoyable life.

Danger in the Wilderness

O Te Patatu is a spectacular and sometimes dangerous stepping off point into the wilderness. Jutting out into the Pacific Ocean it is the most Easterly point of Banks Peninsula; a beautiful and temperamental in-between place, where ocean, earth and sky merge.

We made the voyage out to this far point last week to investigate the potential for establishing a predator-free sea bird colony. Submerged reefs drive upwelling of marine nutrients, while ocean currents and weather patterns bring a wide range of seabirds close to shore; often visible are royal albatross, giant petrel, prions and Hutton’s shearwater.

Predators drove the last of the burrowing sea bird species to extinction on this headland. A special place to local Maori, it was once an important kai (food) gathering place and has associated oral legends and waiata (songs). If we can build a fence and remove introduced mammalian predators then the natural ecosystem can be re-established.

After weeks of heavy rain and heavier cloud the land was sodden, my heart was racing when we lost traction in the 4WD eventually needing to fix chains to move forward. Out on the point the wind was freezing and ripped through our tough outer layers, but deep to the south a break in the weather appeared across the ocean. Finally after weeks, weak sun shone through the clouds and pushed the rain north, so that we were able to enjoy a cup of tea from the trucks deck and watch the wilderness from the top of a cliff at the edge of the world.

 

Sleeping Beauty

 

Yesterday, I found this adult male South Island tomtit dead in a stream. I lovingly bought it home to take photos of it’s incredible beauty before giving it a proper burial.

How do these photos make you feel?

I was in awe of the colors, the delicacy of the bird, it’s perfect form. It must have been all of six-eight grams in weight, for something so small to have so much beauty of life is astounding.

I do not believe that it died of any human induced threat. In fact we have only just started to have tomtits move in closer to our home and can now hear them in the forest close by on most days. They have expanded in their range from Hinewai Reserve ten kilometers away over the 30 years that Hinewai has existed for the protection of nature. As their forest habitat regenerates tomtits are able to expand and are welcomes with joy by me.