Call (+64) 3 304 7654, or Email marie@theseventhgeneration.org

Trappers Guide

The purpose of this Trappers Guide is to improve the operation and maintenance of our trapping program. This guide should help professional and volunteer trappers alike and standardise the management of traps across land ownership or tenure.

Some pests are intelligent enough to learn from bad experiences and will quickly discover how to avoid poisons, traps and spot lights if your first attempts to kill them are not successful. Using a range of traps, baits, toxins and techniques and cycling toxins from one knockdown to the next, helps to avoid a build-up of wise, bait or trap shy animals.


Traps that are not managed to a high standard are likely to increase the likelihood of bait shyness as an almost trapped animal is likely to be a never seen again pest. Poor maintenance also increases the replacement cost of lost or damaged traps.


Another key focus of this guide is for trappers to feel engaged, supported and vital to the success of a trapping program. It is hoped that this guide will help to inspire improvements not only in trapping but in your personal safety and enjoyment.

Trappers-Guide-Revised-Marie-Haley-2020

2017-18 Yellow-Eyed Penguin Report by Marie Haley

For the first time in 2018 we have recorded Banks Peninsula breed and a microchipped yellow-eyed penguin (YEP) returning in the second year moult.
Five nests were located on Banks Peninsula, all within the Wildside. Three nests were abandoned by end December. Three chicks hatched, one disappeared and one died of avian malaria in care, with one fledging with malaria.

2017-18-YEP-Report-Marie-Haley

2017 Green Ribbon Award Winner

The Wildside story started 25 years ago, when a Banks Peninsula farmer set out to protect the little blue penguins on his farm. Since then this project has grown to harness a whole community in protecting the special environment of the Banks Peninsula.

In 2001, the Banks Peninsula Conservation Trust was formed, with the legal ability to covenant private land and manage its own conservation projects.

In 2010, a coordinator was employed to bring together the Trust’s many efforts into one cohesive project – and Wildside was born. The aims of the project were to engage and educate people, to add economic value to the land by protecting its environmental health, to protect forest habitat, stream health, native species and sites of ecological significance, and to promote marine protection.

The project has seen more than 700 predator traps set over 7000 hectares, which has enabled a dramatic turn-around in sea bird species in the area.

The Trust has also achieved protection of a whole stream through private farmland from the summit to the sea. A second stream is now being targeted.

Today, around 25 per cent of the area has been protected through covenants and reserves, allowing the forest to regenerate. The area now boasts the largest private reserve in New Zealand, Hinewai, which covers 1570 hectares.

Source link: Green Ribbon Awards

Meeting the Minister

Yesterday at the 155th Canterbury A&P Show we meet the new Minister for Agriculture, Biosecurity and Rural Communities, Damien O’Connor (pictured right) as well as the Director General of the Ministry for Primary Industries, Martyn Dunn (pictured left). As the 2017 Community Biosecurity Award winner Marie had been invited to meet with the Minister to discuss the Wildside Project.

This was a rare opportunity to tell the inspiring story of the Wildside, where rural farming families have driven conservation efforts on their own land to protect and restore nature for it’s own sake. After 30 years of conservation work, including predator proof fencing, fencing forest habitat and predator control the economic rewards are starting to match the ecological rewards as people come from far and wide to see the species of birds that are returning, such as the New Zealand Falcon, tomtit, penguins, titi and morepork and to walk in the regenerating forests.

It was also an opportunity to raise concerns around the future of the yellow-eyed penguin that is threatened by multiple threats both onshore and at sea.

I hope to work closely with the New Zealand Government into the future in sharing our unique perspective on community conservation, to engage and enable people to make conservation action and appreciation of nature as an important part of our everyday life. By envisioning Seven Generations past, we can create abundance Seven Generations into the future.

He aha te mea nui o te ao : What is the most important thing in the world?

He tangata, he tangata, he tangata : It is the people, it is the people, it is the people!!!

Predator Free New Zealand

Marie Haley lives in her great grandmother’s house on the Banks Peninsula land that was first farmed by her French great-great-great grandfather. It’s on a part of Banks Peninsula known as the ‘Wildside’, named for its rugged landscape, dramatic cliffs and iconic species of birds, insects and plants – some of which are not found anywhere else in New Zealand. It sounds idyllic, but possums, stoats, ferrets, weasels and feral cats have infiltrated this piece of paradise, just as they have decimated the rest of New Zealand.

Marie Haley checks on a yellow-eyed penguin.
Marie Haley Landowner of the Wildside and The Seventh Generation Guide

Protecting the Wildside’s unique biodiversity